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Last update: November 15, 2017
Trends in Jewish Education Teacher Education In-Service Training Education & Administration Formal Education Informal Education Adult Education Technology & Computers Israel Education Learning Resources Conferences & Events

The latest papers and research studies published in the world's leading academic journals in the field of teacher education.
Trends in Jewish Education
HaYidion - Prizmah's Journal of Jewish Education: Differentiation
Jewish day schools want every child to succeed in their learning and social-emotional development. How can schools accomplish those lofty goals while teaching many students in the same classroom? This issue of Hayidion explores that conundrum and showcases various ways that learning can be differentiated to meet the needs, capacities, and interests of different students. Articles address differentiation within the classroom, and supporting teachers to learn, transition to, and apply methods of differentiation. Authors discuss the "how-to" as well as the larger goals and vision.
Publication Year: Fall, 2018    |    Updated in JTEC: October 30, 2017
Technology & Computers
“From the Intuitive to the Intentional”: Designing a Constructivist Online Course
Online programs are becoming more ubiquitous in higher education; however, there has been a lack of research on the merit of this style of educating. Using the concept of constructivism as a framework, the idea that individuals construct their own understanding of world experiences, the authors generated a case study to explore the efficacy of teaching “havruta study,” text analysis in student pairs with instructor facilitation, in an online format. Findings suggest that, through careful consideration of communication styles and student needs, highly interactive in-house courses can be adapted to online settings.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: November 9, 2017
Conferences & Events
Dr. Beth Samuels High School Summer Program at Drisha Institute - Summer, 2018
High school students from around the world spend five weeks (June 26 – July 26, 2018) together, building their knowledge and friendships at Drisha Institute. Known as the Dr. Beth Samuels High School Program, it provides young women with an opportunity to immerse in the study of classical Jewish texts, including Tanakh, Talmud, Halakha and Philosophy. Students live together and engage in both academic and social activities throughout the month.
Publication Year: June 26 – July 26, 2018    |    Updated in JTEC: November 7, 2017
Israel Education
Teaching the Land of Israel as Civic Education: A Historical Exploration
Guided by the assumption that geography teaching is connected to nationalism and civic education, this study focused on the manifestation of different citizenship conceptions in the teaching of the land of Israel as implemented in the Israeli educational system. This historical content analysis of Israeli curricula resulted in a division into three periods. Whereas the first two periods reflected specific citizenship conceptions—nationalistic in the former and individualistic in the latter, the third period is characterized by an amalgamation of contradictory conceptions. These findings point to the potential and challenges facing geography education in creating a truly democratic space.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: October 25, 2017
Education & Administration
Jim Joseph Foundation Invests More than $23.7 Million in Jewish Educator Professional Development and in Leadership Development in Jewish Education
The Jim Joseph Foundation today announced a $23.7 million cumulative investment in 21 organizations following a Request for Proposal (RFP) process to address two critical areas in Jewish education: Educator Professional Development and Leadership Development. The Foundation, which fosters compelling, effective Jewish learning experiences for young Jews in the United States, received 154 Letters of Inquiry (LOIs) following the RFP’s release in April. The grant periods begin now and will continue into 2020 and 2021.
Publication Year: October 23, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: November 9, 2017
In-Service Training
Annual Yeshiva Day School Day of Learning: Creating a Thriving Environment
The theme of the 2017 Jewish Education Project conference is Creating a Thriving Environment in Day School Education: What does it take in today's world to ensure that the children we are responsible for make steady progress in their Jewish and secular learning and living, and flourish as self-aware and healthy individuals? Join hundreds of Jewish day school teachers and leaders at the Manhattan Day School on November 7, 2017 to unpack skills, strategies, and brainstorm new ideas that will transform your school and classroom into an environment where children thrive.
Publication Year: Nov 7, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: October 18, 2017
Learning Resources
National Library of Israel Book of Genesis (Bereshit) Resource Pack
In 2016-7 (5777), Shosh Hill, from the Kerem Primary school in London, together with the NLI team, created weekly Parashat Hashavua newsletters featuring primary sources from the National Library and many creative ideas for primary school students and their families. The Genesis (Bereshit) resource pack presents resources from throughout modern Jewish history that can be connected to the first book of the Torah. This book covers the time period from the creation of the world until the Jewish people – numbering just 70 – descended to Egypt.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: October 25, 2017
Teacher Education
The Journey of Novice Teachers: Perceptions of Interns from a Teacher Training Program for Academics
The literature (Harari, Adler, & Shechter, 2007) discusses at length the difficulties that teachers experience when they start teaching and the number of people leaving the profession due to those difficulties (Arviv-Elyashiv & Zimmerman, 2013). This article discusses the characteristics of the journey for novice teachers from the Teacher Training Programs for Academics as experienced by them during their first year of teaching. The study focused on several aspects of this journey: experiences of success and failure, factors that promote and inhibit success during their internship, the extent to which novice teachers identify with the comparison immigrants in a new culture (Zabar Ben-Yehoshua, 2001), and changes the teachers experienced throughout the year.
Publication Year: Summer 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: November 7, 2017
Adult Education
Adult Learning is the Number One Priority for the Jewish Future
At this precarious moment for ensuring a vibrant Jewish future, there are many priorities for sustaining Jewish life. But among the many fine efforts to ensure a sense of continuity of the Jewish experience – Hebrew schools, summer camps, and engagement of young professionals – there is a route of engagement that has perhaps received the least amount of attention, the least amount funding, and the least prioritization in the greater consciousness of Jewish pedagogy. I am referring to Jewish adult education.
Publication Year: October 11, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: November 7, 2017
Informal Education
National Study on Jewish Teens to Explore How Programs are Helping them “Flourish in Today’s World”
A new national project will explore the learning and growth outcomes of teen experiences offered by the largest organizations that engage Jewish teens in North America. The study, led by The Jewish Education Project and Rosov Consulting, will seek to gather data from as many as 50,000 7th-12th graders across North America.
Publication Year: September 26, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: October 30, 2017
Formal Education
Understanding Students’ Orientations to the Study of Rabbinics
While rabbinic texts have long played a central role in the development of contemporary Judaisms and Jewish day school curricula, we don’t know very much about students’ learning. While we have some sense of what teachers and other experts think constitutes an understanding of rabbinics (Levisohn 2010, and Kanarek and Lehman 2016), there is little data about what students actually know about or are able to do with particular texts, or what sense they make of rabbinics as a whole. In the spring of 2017, as part of the Mandel Center’s Students’ Understanding of Rabbinics project, we interviewed twenty students recruited from two Jewish community day high schools about their study of rabbinics.
Publication Year: November 3, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: November 9, 2017
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