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Last update: March 29, 2017
Trends in Jewish Education Teacher Education In-Service Training Education & Administration Formal Education Informal Education Adult Education Technology & Computers Israel Education Learning Resources Conferences & Events

The latest papers and research studies published in the world's leading academic journals in the field of teacher education.
Trends in Jewish Education
Who will Guide, Nourish and Love the Next Generation?
I shared my personal story earlier this fall, as the opening introduction to a panel I offered at the Israeli-American Council (IAC)) national conference in Washington DC. At this conference over 2100 American Jews and Israeli-Americans asked questions about identity formation and the future of our community and children. We explored ways to connect American Jews with Israeli-Americans and worked together to strengthen our connection to Israel.
Publication Year: February 3, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 26, 2017
Technology & Computers
Eight Digital Tools for Students to Create Original Purim Shpiel Videos
Today it’s common for synagogues, Jewish schools, and other institutions to each put on their own Purim shpiel, and though these are always enjoyable to watch, there’s usually a limited number of people who get to actively participate. This year, ensure that every one of your students gets to be a part of this fun tradition as a producer, not only an audience member, by giving them the digital tools to create their own original Purim shpiel videos! In addition to having fun, they’ll be learning important media creation skills that are vital to succeeding in today’s world. Read below to find the tool that’s right for your classroom.
Publication Year: March 02, 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: February 13, 2017
Conferences & Events
The Jewish of Jewish Day Schools at the Prizmah Conference
The Prizmah Jewish Day School conference on February 5-7, 2017, in Chicago was a strong manifestation of the energy and excitement around the birth of Prizmah, the new central address for Jewish day schools, which staged this impressive gathering of more than 1000 stakeholders in Jewish education. The conference featured innovative shared experiences ranging from interactive improv workshops and custom sketches of Jewish day school life by Second City Works to a keynote lecture by world-renowned game designer and author Jane McGonigal, who encouraged the audience to consider: Why don’t our learning platforms work more like a game?
Publication Year: March 6, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 29, 2017
Israel Education
To Honor Slain Sons, Families Send 1000s of Purim Gifts to Diaspora
Israelis departing Ben-Gurion International Airport last week delivered 2,500 Purim gift bags to Jews around the world as part of a project in memory of Gil-ad Shaer, Naftali Fraenkel and Eyal Yifrach. The three Israeli teenage boys were kidnapped and murdered by Palestinian terrorists as they headed home from their West Bank yeshiva in June 2014. The project, The Jewish Connection, is an initiative of a non-profit organization founded by the boys’ parents to further and strengthen the international Jewish solidarity demonstrated during the weeks between the boys’ kidnapping and discovery of their bodies.
Publication Year: March 15, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 29, 2017
Education & Administration
The Voucher Model: Jumpstarting Teen Engagement
If the Birthright-Israel model could be adapted to the realm of teen education and engagement there would be a “change in the rules” and organizations would be incentivized to grow and reach out to new populations. Furthermore, most if not all the abovementioned advantages would emerge in the teen realm as well.
Publication Year: March 19, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 29, 2017
In-Service Training
Join the New Mandel Teacher Educator Institute Cohort 8
The Mandel Teacher Educator Institute (MTEI) is a program that strengthens the Jewish community by developing educational leaders – “teachers of teachers” – who are spearheading powerful and innovative professional development experiences for their institutions and communities. We believe that ongoing, substantive professional development for educational leaders and teachers is central to revitalizing Jewish education. MTEI’s intensive two-year program that consists of six, 4-day seminars with assignments in the field between meetings is a building block toward this goal.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 1, 2017
Learning Resources
24 Hours of Chesed
On Sunday, April 2, 2017 Areyvut invites schools, synagogues, families, community organizations and individuals to fill the day with kindness. Areyvut is a non-profit organization whose mission is to empower people to infuse their lives with the core Jewish values of chesed (kindness), tzedakah (charity) and tikkun olam (social justice). We are asking organizations and individuals to commit to service programs and acts of kindness at specific times so that on April 2 we can facilitate kindness continuously for an entire 24 hour period.
Publication Year: March 06, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 20, 2017
Teacher Education
Inclusive Attitudes: Considering Student Discussion Board Responses as Indicators of Attitudes
Compelling reasons exist for moving toward inclusion of diverse learners in Jewish day schools. Graduate programs face the challenge of preparing pre- and in-service teachers as effective educators for inclusive settings. While the development of skills is vital, the inculcation of positive attitudes regarding diverse learners may be equally important. This article explores the process of using student work to evaluate students’ attitudes in the context of a course on teaching diverse learners in a Master’s degree program.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 19, 2017
Adult Education
Adult Education: A New Frontier in the Jewish Day School Movement?
Day Schools are confronted with a particularly daunting mission. In addition to providing a rigorous dual education, they work indefatigably to inspire students religiously. At times, this mission feels Sisyphean. Our children are saturated in modern culture. Too often, turning their attention toward a Torah lifestyle is a terrifyingly daunting task. Even when our efforts appear to meet with success, students often regress to the mean. Moreover, despite their remarkable commitment to day school education, not all parents are positioned to inspire religious growth in their children. Indeed, any honest educator will confirm that this is one of the greatest challenges confronting Modern Orthodoxy. It follows, then, that to best inspire our students, we must inspire our families and communities. To thrive religiously, our children must inhabit spiritually nurturing ecosystems. In a word, schools have begun to invest in community education because it is critical to the success of their mission of educating children.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 29, 2017
Informal Education
Inclusion Coordinators at Jewish Summer Camps: Roles and Challenges
As appreciation of the impact of Jewish camping has grown, so have efforts to increase the number of campers able to participate in these settings. Inclusion of campers with disabilities, though not a new phenomenon, has likewise expanded. As more services are provided to campers with disabilities, more camps are hiring an Inclusion Coordinator to spearhead and manage these initiatives. This article explores the work done by these professionals and the challenges they face in doing so. The work of Inclusion Coordinators is discussed in the context of the evolving nature of camp-based inclusion efforts as a whole. The authors see inclusion at summer camps as an area in which much creative work has been done, and would benefit not only from additional resources but also from increased coordination as “a field.”
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 15, 2017
Formal Education
The Parent Perspective: Disabilities and Jewish Day Schools
The following study describes the experiences of parents with a child with a disability in Jewish day schools. The findings suggest marked differences in the experiences of parents whose child was able to remain in the day school and those who left as a result of their child’s disability. In the latter group, the themes of loneliness and marginalization were common. Although parents hoped to feel included in the Jewish community—with Jewish day school an important expression of this desire and commitment—many found few appropriate programs and services and a general lack of awareness of and sensitivity to disability issues in the Jewish community.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 15, 2017
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