MOFET JTEC - Search Results

JTEC Home The MOFET Institute Home Page Home Page
Trends in Jewish Education Teacher Education In-Service Training Education & Administration Formal Education Informal Education Adult Education Technology & Computers Israel Education Learning Resources Conferences & Events

Search Results for 'Jewish identity' (Keyword)
245 items found 1 / 25 Go to page 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1   |   From section Informal Education
Religious Change & Religious Counsel: Nurturing Growth among Women's Seminary Students
As a teacher at a women’s seminary I am very interested in the process of religious change among my students, and especially, in the role that teachers play in fostering religious change. Since one of the institutions where I teach places considerable emphasis on informal student-teacher relationships, I decided to use a case study that I had to complete as part of my Masters in Jewish Education to explore this topic further. While I learnt many things from my case study, I believe that the following lessons are worthwhile sharing.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: May 23, 2017
2   |   From section Education & Administration
Learners Matter Most: The Rest Is Commentary
The Jewish world needs to realize that the world has changed considerably since most institutions of Jewish education were established. In order to have impact on the vast majority of Jews today, Jewish education must stop defaulting to literacy over values, texts over ethics, and the past over the present and future. For Jewish learning to be both meaningful and relevant it must empower Jews (and fellow travelers) to thrive—in their personal success and happiness, in being more socially connected to each other and their communities—and better equipped to make the world a better place.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: May 3, 2017
3   |   From section Education & Administration
Outcomes of Jewish Education and the Philanthropic Community
So, what should our outcomes be? First, Jewish learning is an end in itself. Our tradition values education as one of the most essential aspects of being a Jew. About that there is no question, no matter what its impact may be on later Jewish identity. Second, giving young people the best possible Jewish education increases the likelihood that being Jewish will speak to them in their personal lives. It can become a source of values and ideas, some of which will run counter to the weaknesses of the culture in which we live. We want to cultivate those dispositions in the people that we educate, and we believe as educators that Judaism as a religion and Jewish culture in its broadest sense offers a tradition of wisdom and practice that can make a difference in an individual’s life and in bettering the state of the world.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: May 3, 2017
4   |   From section Formal Education
The “Draw-A-Religious Jew” Test and Students’ Religious Identities
A quantitative arts-based study was conducted with high school juniors and seniors at a community Jewish school in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. This group represented a diverse mixture of students who populate the school in relation to gender, involvement in school life, and religious denominations. Students were prompted to draw a religious Jew and the images were scored based on five different markers.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 24, 2017
5   |   From section Formal Education
Developing and Transmitting Religious Identity: Curriculum and Pedagogy in Modern Orthodox Jewish Schools
This paper argues that American modern Orthodoxy is facing a crisis caused at least in part by problems of student identity formation. A range of ethnographic research conducted over the last decade suggests that modern Orthodox students feel increasingly disengaged from religious studies classes—and that this disconnection is a factor in the movement’s decline. I argue that student disengagement may be a result of these schools’ inability to accommodate students’ own epistemological commitments to religious pluralism and autonomy, as well as the mainly secular American concerns central to their developing personal identities.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 24, 2017
6   |   From section Adult Education
White Fire: The Power of Jewish Learning through the Arts
Author Jody Hirsh
This notion of multiplicity of meaning is the core inspiration of the Jewish Artists’ Laboratory of the Midwest. The lab is a network of professional Jewish artists in six cities in the Midwest – Milwaukee, Madison, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Chicago, and Cleveland – now in its sixth year. In each city, a group meets twice monthly to study a theme related to Jewish life, and to create works of art for an annual exhibit/showcase based on their study. The artists include painters, printmakers, sculptors, fabric artists, musicians, poets, playwrights, choreographers, mixed media artists, photographers, and more.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 29, 2017
7   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Who will Guide, Nourish and Love the Next Generation?
Author Rachel Raz
I shared my personal story earlier this fall, as the opening introduction to a panel I offered at the Israeli-American Council (IAC)) national conference in Washington DC. At this conference over 2100 American Jews and Israeli-Americans asked questions about identity formation and the future of our community and children. We explored ways to connect American Jews with Israeli-Americans and worked together to strengthen our connection to Israel.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 26, 2017
8   |   From section Informal Education
Experiential Learning and Values Education at a School Youth Camp: Maintaining Jewish Culture and Heritage
In our post-modern, globalised world, there is a risk of unique cultural heritages being lost. This loss contributes to the detriment of civilization, because individuals need to be rooted in their own specific identity in order to actively participate in community life. This article discusses a longitudinal case study of the efforts being made by Australian Jewish schools to maintain Jewish heritage through annual experiential religious education camps, coordinated in a programme called Counterpoint. The researchers’ aim was to analyse how a school youth camp can serve as a site for socialisation and education into a cultural and religious heritage through experiential learning and informal education.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: January 5, 2017
9   |   From section Israel Education
Education Minister Bennett and Jewish Agency Chairman Natan Sharansky Celebrate Diaspora Week with Young Jews around the World
Israel Education and Diaspora Affairs Minister Naftali Bennett and Jewish Agency Chairman Natan Sharansky hosted an online discussion with Jewish children and teenagers in three different continents Tuesday night to mark the first-ever Week of Strengthening the Connection to Diaspora Jewry. The cabinet announced the launch of this initiative in July, deciding to dedicate a week every year to Diaspora-Israel ties in light of “the many complex challenges shared by the Jewish nation in Israel and the world.” The conversation between Sharansky, Bennett and the Jewish youngsters was conducted via a video conference held at the Jewish Agency’s situation room in Jerusalem.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: January 15, 2017
10   |   From section Israel Education
Honeymoon Israel: Building Ties That Bind
Since the Spring of 2014 we have been sharing our journey through the launch and ongoing progress of Honeymoon Israel (HMI). From the beginning, HMI partnered with Rosov Consulting to support, document and evaluate the program’s early impact on the couples who participate. In September 2016, the Rosov team delivered its first outcomes report documenting the outcomes for couples on twelve separate trips taking place between June 2015 and March 2016. Even as the Rosov team continues to assess the outcomes of our current trips, we have come together to share some of the findings that, we believe, have implications for others working to engage young couples and young families around their Jewish journeys.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: December 21, 2016
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10