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Search Results for 'Formal education' (Keyword)
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1   |   From section Conferences & Events
Dr. Beth Samuels High School Summer Program at Drisha Institute - Summer, 2018
High school students from around the world spend five weeks (June 26 – July 26, 2018) together, building their knowledge and friendships at Drisha Institute. Known as the Dr. Beth Samuels High School Program, it provides young women with an opportunity to immerse in the study of classical Jewish texts, including Tanakh, Talmud, Halakha and Philosophy. Students live together and engage in both academic and social activities throughout the month.
Publication Year: 2018    |    Updated in JTEC: November 7, 2017
2   |   From section Formal Education
Hebrew and Jewish Peoplehood
This past week I was invited along with leaders of universities, college campus programs, Israel trips, camps and other educational programs to participate in a discussion on elevating the status of Hebrew language in the North American Jewish community. Over the years, it has been pointed out that North American Jews, more so Americans, do not have the same level of Hebrew proficiency as do Jews in other countries. Some opine that this is because English is the lingua franca across the globe. Others believe that Hebrew language proficiency is not essential for participating in Jewish life in North America.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: October 30, 2017
3   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
HaYidion - Prizmah's Journal of Jewish Education: Differentiation
Jewish day schools want every child to succeed in their learning and social-emotional development. How can schools accomplish those lofty goals while teaching many students in the same classroom? This issue of Hayidion explores that conundrum and showcases various ways that learning can be differentiated to meet the needs, capacities, and interests of different students. Articles address differentiation within the classroom, and supporting teachers to learn, transition to, and apply methods of differentiation. Authors discuss the "how-to" as well as the larger goals and vision.
Publication Year: 2018    |    Updated in JTEC: October 30, 2017
4   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Sarah Schenirer and Innovative Change: The Myths and Facts
Prior to World War I, traditional Jewish parents in Eastern Europe provided their daughters with, at the very most, a few years of formal religious education. If girls received any schooling beyond that, it would be at a secular institution; it was common, in fact, even for prominent Orthodox rabbis to send their daughters to secular schools. This all changed thanks to a Galician Jew named Sarah Schenirer, who founded a network of girls’ schools—known as Bais Yaakov—that grew rapidly in the 1920 and 30s; today, most ḥaredi girls attend Bais Yaakov institutions. Schenirer has since become a hero in ultra-Orthodox circles. But the popular version of her story muddles some key details.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: August 31, 2017
5   |   From section Conferences & Events
Dr. Beth Samuels High School Summer Program at Drisha Institute
High school students from around the world spend five weeks (June 27 – July 28, 2017) together, building their knowledge and friendships at Drisha Institute. Known as the Dr. Beth Samuels High School Program, it provides young women with an opportunity to immerse in the study of classical Jewish texts, including Tanakh, Talmud, Halakha and Philosophy. Students live together and engage in both academic and social activities throughout the month.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: November 30, 2016
6   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
No Candy Store, No Pizza Shops, No Maxi-Skirts, No Makeup”: Socializing Orthodox Jewish Girls Through Schooling
For American Orthodox Jewish girls, Bais Yaakov schools became the primary location of socialization. School administrators clearly articulated curricular learning as secondary to the primary goal of socializing girls to embrace Orthodox Jewish roles and observances. In the 1960s–1980s, disturbed by new trends in society, school leaders imposed new rules and policies, redefining proper Orthodox girlhood. They emphasized modest dress, and restricted coed fraternization and popular culture. Girls engaged in this socialization process and expressed agency in different ways. This resulted in the creation of a hybrid American Orthodox youth culture. While at times they resisted, ultimately girls accepted the values and observances school leaders advanced.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: March 31, 2016
7   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Record Number of New Immigrants to Enter Israel's School System
The school year is set to begin in Israel on Tuesday, with more than 2 million children and teens poised to enter or return to the school system. Of them, a record number of 2,900 students will be attending an Israeli school for the first time, having immigrated to Israel this summer. Some 360 new immigrants will be starting school as Israeli first graders. According to the Immigrant Absorption Ministry, the number of new immigrant students this year constitutes an increase of more than 50% over last year. In September 2014, only 1,900 new immigrant students entered Israel's school system.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in JTEC: September 16, 2015
8   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Call for Papers: Social Scientific Study of Jews and Education
Contemporary Jewry is proud to announce a Call for Papers for a special issue focusing on education. Guest edited by Professor Ari Y Kelman (Stanford University), the special issue will feature articles and studies that take a social scientific approach to scholarship at the intersection of Jewish Studies and Education. As the only academic journal dedicated to publishing social scientific research about Jews, Contemporary Jewry invites proposals that engage with educational phenomena within broader social, cultural, religious, or political contexts.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in JTEC: July 16, 2015
9   |   From section Formal Education
Special Curriculum on Jewish Preparation for Burial
Rochel Berman of Boca Raton — a member of the Boca Raton Synagogue Chevra Kadisha (sacred burial society) and consultant to the Congregation B'nai Torah Chevra Kadisha in Boca Raton — has embarked on a trailblazing project to develop a curriculum and study guide for Jewish high school students to learn about the Jewish preparation for burial. Berman has partnered with Rabbi Jonathan Kroll, head of school at Weinbaum Yeshiva High School (WYHS) in Boca Raton, to introduce the eight-session course titled "The Final Journey: How Judaism Dignifies the Passage."
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in JTEC: April 19, 2015
10   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
The Third Stage of Jewish Education
The first stage of Jewish education, connected to our minds, asked the question – “What do I know?” The second stage of Jewish education, connected to our hearts, asked the question – “Am I connected to what I know?” Both stages addressed the needs of their times, and yet both came with ‘shadow-sides’. We are now ready for the next step, for the third stage of Jewish education: educating for life. Educating to make us better people.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in JTEC: March 4, 2015
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