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Search Results for 'Experiential education' (Keyword)
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1   |   From section Learning Resources
Calling Jewish Educators: Free Jerusalem Scavenger Hunt Resource
In this FREE Jewish educators' resource guide, we will give you a basis for a Jerusalem Scavenger Hunt activity and we will give you a list of our favorite Jerusalem/Israel resources. This guide can be used by formal and informal Jewish education settings alike. The Jerusalem Scavenger Hunt resource guide can be great for planning a Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Day) activity, or even as part of your Hebrew school or summer camp Jerusalem curriculum.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: April 26, 2017
2   |   From section Informal Education
Let's Get Campers Jumping and Running to Learn Hebrew!
Hebrew Through Movement has been energizing Hebrew learning across North American for the last 5 years. With its start in Cleveland, OH over a dozen years ago, HTM brings laughter and smiles to the learning of Hebrew. And, because of its kinesthetic nature, Hebrew is sticking deep in the kishkes of its learners. While also part of learning in early childhood and day school settings, HTM has gained huge traction in part-time Jewish educational programs. Based on the number of educational programs who enrolled teachers in the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland’s online seminar (over 900), it would be easy to suggest that 9,000 – 15,000 youngsters have been jumping, running and pointing their way to Hebrew learning.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 26, 2017
3   |   From section Informal Education
Auschwitz As Seen Through the ‘Lens of Faith’
After Orthodox educators traveled to Poland to provide insight into experiences of observant Jews at Auschwitz- Birkenau, tour guides at the museum have recently incorporated the “lens of faith” when showing visitors around the concentration camp. While Auschwitz has for years worked with Yad Vashem and the US Holocaust Memorial Museum to uncover the depth of the Nazi atrocities perpetrated against the Jews, the recent initiative of Brooklyn’s Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center is the first of its kind by the Orthodox community.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 19, 2017
4   |   From section Informal Education
Inclusion Coordinators at Jewish Summer Camps: Roles and Challenges
As appreciation of the impact of Jewish camping has grown, so have efforts to increase the number of campers able to participate in these settings. Inclusion of campers with disabilities, though not a new phenomenon, has likewise expanded. As more services are provided to campers with disabilities, more camps are hiring an Inclusion Coordinator to spearhead and manage these initiatives. This article explores the work done by these professionals and the challenges they face in doing so. The work of Inclusion Coordinators is discussed in the context of the evolving nature of camp-based inclusion efforts as a whole. The authors see inclusion at summer camps as an area in which much creative work has been done, and would benefit not only from additional resources but also from increased coordination as “a field.”
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 15, 2017
5   |   From section Informal Education
Ramah Releases Alumni Survey
The Ramah Camping Movement has released the results of “The Alumni of Ramah Camps: A Portrait of Jewish Engagement.” This survey of more than 5,000 camper alumni was conducted by Professor Steven M. Cohen of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion and the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at Stanford University.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 22, 2017
6   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Jewish Literacy – Unfortunately, it’s Not Enough
We have a problem to overcome: Teacher training and professional development programs that nurture the inner lives of educators are not practical or feasible given the present landscape of Jewish education. The ground needs to be prepared before the seeds can be planted. The first step is to focus on the agents of change: principals, heads of Judaic departments, donors, and foundations – the leadership. We need a paradigm-shift at the top. Our students will not be more spiritually alive than their teachers, and our teachers will not be more spiritually alive than their bosses. If our ultimate goal is to foster the inner lives of our students, then we must foster the inner lives of our educators. To do this – to develop awe and vibrant spiritual lives in our teachers – we first need to foster the inner lives of the Jewish educational leadership and begin the process of real change in a school’s culture
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 12, 2017
7   |   From section In-Service Training
Applications Open: Senior Educators Cohort at M²: The Institute for Experiential Jewish Education
M²: The Institute for Experiential Jewish Education has opened applications for the second cohort of its Senior Educators Cohort. M² develops and provides training and research to advance the field of experiential Jewish education and invest in the growth of its educators. The M² Senior Educators Cohort (SEC) is a selective international training program for experiential Jewish educators. Open to educators with at least five years of experience, SEC enables participants to articulate, refine and sharpen their practice by exposing them to theories and methods that serve as the foundations of experiential Jewish education.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: January 17, 2017
8   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Positive Psychology, Trickling Down from Universities to Day Schools, Seen as New Key to Engaging Jewish Teens
At a recent conference, “Happiness Hacks: Feel Good, Do Good and Stop Obsessing about Jewish Identity,” the Jewish Education Project partnered with the Lippman Kanfer Foundation to teach more than 400 educators and lay leaders how to integrate positive psychology into their curricula. The conference included a lecture by renowned Israeli positive psychologist Dan Ariely and group exercises in “laughter yoga,” a series of exercises that induce laughter to promote healing. “In the past, the purpose of Jewish education was to [allow students to] fully participate in American life without giving up their Jewish identity — now, that’s not enough,” said Aryeh Ben David, founder of Ayeka, a Jerusalem-based nonprofit that focuses on “soulful” Jewish education — teaching Jewish subjects with more “personal meaning and impact.” “Teens today don’t need a classroom to access information — they can get anything they want to know online,” said Ben David in a phone interview. This changes the need for school “in a profound way.” “Jewish education needs to become a vehicle to enhance students’ lives, rather than just transmit content.” Ayeka is currently working with four schools in the U.S. to train Jewish educators in “soulful education.”
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: January 18, 2017
9   |   From section Informal Education
Experiential Learning and Values Education at a School Youth Camp: Maintaining Jewish Culture and Heritage
In our post-modern, globalised world, there is a risk of unique cultural heritages being lost. This loss contributes to the detriment of civilization, because individuals need to be rooted in their own specific identity in order to actively participate in community life. This article discusses a longitudinal case study of the efforts being made by Australian Jewish schools to maintain Jewish heritage through annual experiential religious education camps, coordinated in a programme called Counterpoint. The researchers’ aim was to analyse how a school youth camp can serve as a site for socialisation and education into a cultural and religious heritage through experiential learning and informal education.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: January 5, 2017
10   |   From section Informal Education
It Turns Out, You Really Can Learn Hebrew at Camp
Our two organizations – Rosov Consulting and Middlebury College – have been involved in studying an initiative that is at a point of inflection, on the brink of transitioning from start-up to scale. We have had the opportunity to document and evaluate, from the time of its birth – really, since its conception – the Areivim Hebrew at Camp Initiative. With the initiative moving to a second stage of development, developing a co-brand with the Foundation for Jewish Camp, this a timely moment to share some of what we have learned. The goal of the Hebrew at Camp Initiative is to create a movement of Hebrew immersive and partially-immersive Jewish day camp programs where pre- and elementary-school-age children can experience, learn and enjoy modern spoken Hebrew utilizing the Proficiency Approach, a gold standard in language education. The concept is this: young children spend their summer at Jewish day camp; their ability to communicate in Hebrew develops dramatically, they develop a positive connection to Israel, and they have as much fun as their fellow-campers.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: December 14, 2016
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