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Search Results for 'Special needs' (Keyword)
51 items found 1 / 6
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1   |   From section Formal Education
Sinai Schools to Hit Riverdale
The Sinai Schools, a network of Jewish special education institutions that began in 1982 with three students at one site in New Jersey and has grown to six locations with 150 students in the state, will establish its first branch in New York City next year. Sinai has announced that it will open a “school within a school” at the SAR Academy in the Riverdale section of the Bronx beginning in September 2018. Aura Lurie, who has served as a teacher for more than a decade in the SAR Academy “inclusion” special education program, will be director of the Sinai pilot program at SAR.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: September 6, 2017
2   |   From section Formal Education
To Include or Not to Include—This Is the Question: Attitudes of Inclusive Teachers toward the Inclusion of Pupils with Intellectual Disabilities in Elementary Schools
Numerous studies have emphasized the relationship between success of policies of inclusion and acceptance and accommodation of students with intellectual disabilities in mainstream settings and teachers’ positive attitudes toward them. Using semi-structured interviews and interpretive and constructivist strategies, the present study qualitatively analyzes the attitudes of 40 inclusive teachers regarding the inclusion of pupils with intellectual disabilities in mainstream elementary school settings in Israel.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: June 7, 2017
3   |   From section Informal Education
Inclusion Coordinators at Jewish Summer Camps: Roles and Challenges
As appreciation of the impact of Jewish camping has grown, so have efforts to increase the number of campers able to participate in these settings. Inclusion of campers with disabilities, though not a new phenomenon, has likewise expanded. As more services are provided to campers with disabilities, more camps are hiring an Inclusion Coordinator to spearhead and manage these initiatives. This article explores the work done by these professionals and the challenges they face in doing so. The work of Inclusion Coordinators is discussed in the context of the evolving nature of camp-based inclusion efforts as a whole. The authors see inclusion at summer camps as an area in which much creative work has been done, and would benefit not only from additional resources but also from increased coordination as “a field.”
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 15, 2017
4   |   From section Teacher Education
Inclusive Attitudes: Considering Student Discussion Board Responses as Indicators of Attitudes
Compelling reasons exist for moving toward inclusion of diverse learners in Jewish day schools. Graduate programs face the challenge of preparing pre- and in-service teachers as effective educators for inclusive settings. While the development of skills is vital, the inculcation of positive attitudes regarding diverse learners may be equally important. This article explores the process of using student work to evaluate students’ attitudes in the context of a course on teaching diverse learners in a Master’s degree program.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 19, 2017
5   |   From section Informal Education
It’s Off to Work We Go: Attitude Toward Disability at Vocational Training Programs at Jewish Summer Camps
Baglieri and Shapiro (2012) argue that considering attitudes toward disability is an important step toward building a more inclusive society. This study examines attitudes toward disability of staff members of vocational and independent living skills programs for young adults with disabilities in four Jewish summer camps. McDermott and Varenne’s (1995) three approaches for understanding disability were used to examine staff attitudes. Concrete instantiations of all three approaches were found during site visits and interviews at the camps. Implications for the continued development of inclusive educational opportunities in the Jewish community are discussed.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 19, 2017
6   |   From section Formal Education
The Parent Perspective: Disabilities and Jewish Day Schools
The following study describes the experiences of parents with a child with a disability in Jewish day schools. The findings suggest marked differences in the experiences of parents whose child was able to remain in the day school and those who left as a result of their child’s disability. In the latter group, the themes of loneliness and marginalization were common. Although parents hoped to feel included in the Jewish community—with Jewish day school an important expression of this desire and commitment—many found few appropriate programs and services and a general lack of awareness of and sensitivity to disability issues in the Jewish community.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 15, 2017
7   |   From section In-Service Training
Inclusion Assistants in General Education Settings - A Model for In-service Training
Author Anat Moshe
The inclusion assistant (IA) is a fairly new position in the education system and is the outcome of current ideological and legislative steps to include students with special needs into the general educational system. The IA's function is to personally accompany students with severe disabilities - autism, developmental disabilities, physical disabilities, and mental disorders - in the general class. This paper reviews the roles and characteristics of this challenging position and offers a model of an easy-to-implement, in-service, professional development program with minimal time demands that can serve to increase the IA's skills.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 22, 2017
8   |   From section Teacher Education
The Inclusion Assistant: Who Is She Supposed to Be? An Exploratory Study
Following the almost worldwide implementation of policies giving all students – including those with special education needs – the right to learn within the general education system, there has been a sharp increase in the number of inclusion assistants (IA). IAs provide special-needs students one-to-one accompaniment, allowing them to function in the general education classroom and reducing the onus on the classroom teacher in such cases. Unfortunately, many, if not most, of IAs enter the system without suitable training or special qualifications and often neither they nor the teachers have a clear idea of how they should fulfill their role. This exploratory study used a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews to identify and compare how 30 classroom teachers and IAs define the IA’s role. It also studied how eight IAs changed their perception of their roles after attending an IA training course and what the implications of such courses may be.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: January 17, 2017
9   |   From section Adult Education
Special in Uniform
In 2014, I left the army and joined Lt. Col Ariel Almog and, together with the Yad Layeled organization (and in partnership with JNF-USA), we founded the “Special in Uniform” program. The program integrates thousands of young people with disabilities into the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) and, in turn, into Israeli society. We see the inclusion of people with disabilities in the army as a way to help usher them into a self-sufficient life once they are discharged from the army. Our belief is that everyone belongs and has the right to reach his or her full potential. Special in Uniform focuses on the unique talents of each individual participant to help each one find a job that is a perfect fit for the individual’s skills within the IDF. The attention is on the ability, not the disability, of each individual, encouraging independence and integration into society.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: November 23, 2016
10   |   From section In-Service Training
The Matan Institute for Early Childhood Educators – 2016-7
Early Childhood Educators welcome families during a critical "entry point" of Jewish life. Research shows that early identification and early intervention are key to helping children reach their highest potential. Fusing these two important concepts, MATAN Institute for Early Child Educators participants will receive the training and tools that you need to create Jewish Early Childhood environments that successfully welcome and include all children. Early Childhood Directors are asked to participate with two of their classroom teachers, and each school will work with a Matan mentor throughout the year to help advance that school's short and long-term inclusion goals. The Institute sessions will be held in New York city on Sunday, September 25, 2016, December 4, 2016 and May 7, 2017 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: July 6, 2016
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