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Search Results for 'Hebrew language' (Keyword)
163 items found 1 / 17 Go to page 
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1   |   From section Formal Education
Enhancing Language and Print-Concept Skills by Using Interactive Storybook Reading in Kindergarten
The effectiveness of a short interactive storybook-reading intervention programme delivered by a kindergarten teacher to develop language and print-concept skills was examined in 30 Hebrew-speaking kindergarten children exhibiting different levels of emergent literacy skills. Post-intervention, the intervention group showed a clear advantage over a control group on most measures, including vocabulary, morphology, phonological awareness and print concepts.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 26, 2017
2   |   From section Informal Education
Let's Get Campers Jumping and Running to Learn Hebrew!
Hebrew Through Movement has been energizing Hebrew learning across North American for the last 5 years. With its start in Cleveland, OH over a dozen years ago, HTM brings laughter and smiles to the learning of Hebrew. And, because of its kinesthetic nature, Hebrew is sticking deep in the kishkes of its learners. While also part of learning in early childhood and day school settings, HTM has gained huge traction in part-time Jewish educational programs. Based on the number of educational programs who enrolled teachers in the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland’s online seminar (over 900), it would be easy to suggest that 9,000 – 15,000 youngsters have been jumping, running and pointing their way to Hebrew learning.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 26, 2017
3   |   From section Formal Education
Toward Full Hebrew Proficiency
The academic benefits of language immersion have been known for over 50 years and, in the case of Hebrew, for at least the past 25 years, since two Australian professors of linguistics, Tim McNamara and Edina Eisikovits, and I collaborated on a landmark study of Hebrew language immersion in a Jewish day school in Melbourne. The findings on attitudes toward Hebrew language study are more recent: this month, the results of a study of attitudes toward Hebrew language learning in 41 Jewish day schools across North America were published by Professors Alex Pomson and Jack Wertheimer.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 19, 2017
4   |   From section Technology & Computers
How Google Translate is Making Learning English Fun in Israel
Author Lee Reshef
Using neural machine translation, we’ve just updated Hebrew and Arabic languages on Google Translate. But what you can’t see on the surface is that these translations also improved thanks to students across Israel. As English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students used the Google Translate Community platform to learn and practice their English, they actually improved translations for everyone in the process.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 19, 2017
5   |   From section Formal Education
Hebrew for What?: Hebrew at the Heart of Jewish Day Schools
The AVI CHAI Foundation is delighted to release a new research report by Dr. Alex Pomson and Dr. Jack Wertheimer on the teaching of Hebrew language in Jewish day schools. As a foundation that has devoted significant energy and tens of millions of dollars toward Hebrew teaching and learning, we see a number of opportunities for future action emerging from the report. We hope that the reflections below will be helpful to others who share a passion for producing a new generation fluent in the texts and language of the Jewish people.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 5, 2017
6   |   From section Formal Education
How Do I Provide More Opportunities for My Students to Speak Hebrew Inside and Outside the Classroom?
As a Hebrew language teacher, I’ve always asked myself this question over and over again. My students spend a short amount of time in my class every day, and this time is so precious and valuable. Every second should be planned effectively. My students know that wasting time is a big pet peeve of mine. There is time to write, read, use technology tools to enhance students’ learning, ask questions, discuss, work in a small group or with a partner and also to play games. As teachers, we want to make sure that our students use the new gained skills outside our classroom. How can I do this in my Hebrew class? What are some good ways to encourage my students to converse in Hebrew and become more proficient in speaking the language?
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 8, 2017
7   |   From section Formal Education
Learning to Read Hebrew in a Jewish Community School: Learners' Experiences and Perception
Author S. Walters
This paper presents findings from a qualitative study conducted in a large Reform Jewish Sunday school in the UK. It focuses on learners’ experiences and perceptions of learning to read Hebrew in the school as well as in the other sites in which they were learning to read. These experiences and perceptions are neglected in other research accounts. The findings reveal important insights into learners’ experiences, enjoyments, frustrations and expectations regarding both the purposes and the processes of learning to read in Hebrew and raise issues about learning and teaching. The findings contribute to wider debates about literacy and learning to read and address questions raised in the literature concerning what children do with, and make of, the language learning they experience in their community school setting.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 22, 2017
8   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Who will Guide, Nourish and Love the Next Generation?
Author Rachel Raz
I shared my personal story earlier this fall, as the opening introduction to a panel I offered at the Israeli-American Council (IAC)) national conference in Washington DC. At this conference over 2100 American Jews and Israeli-Americans asked questions about identity formation and the future of our community and children. We explored ways to connect American Jews with Israeli-Americans and worked together to strengthen our connection to Israel.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 26, 2017
9   |   From section Formal Education
Missions, Methods, and Assessment in Hebrew Language Education: Case Studies of American Jewish Day Schools
This research consists of three case studies conducted within American Jewish day schools (JDSs). Addressing some of the issues pointed to by past researchers, this investigation focuses on the following discrete areas of Hebrew language (HL) programs: the stated visions for Hebrew language learning as noted in the mission statements and other documents of the schools and as articulated by teachers and administrators, the methodologies employed by Hebrew and Jewish Studies educators within these institutions, and the assessment practices employed by these schools and educators to determine whether the expressed goals of these programs are being met. By exploring the missions, methods, and assessment processes within these Hebrew language programs, and contrasting these aspects of the schools, we come to a better understanding of the inner workings of these programs and the issues that may be addressed in practice and future research.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: January 5, 2017
10   |   From section Israel Education
Israel to Spend $36 Million on Jewish Education in Diaspora Schools
The Education and Diaspora Affairs Ministries plan to spend as much as 136 million shekels ($35.8 million) over the next four years to develop programs for Jewish schools overseas, the first time Israel has engaged in such a big educational undertaking in diaspora schools. The two ministries, which are both led by Habayit Hayehudi Chairman Naftali Bennett, plan to develop programs on Israel, the Hebrew language and Jewish history as well as provide schools with expert advice, teacher training and pedagogical services. Initially the program will be offered to 65 Jewish schools in Europe and countries of the former Soviet Union.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: December 14, 2016
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