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Search Results for 'Research' (Keyword)
622 items found 1 / 63 Go to page 
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1   |   From section Informal Education
Inclusion Coordinators at Jewish Summer Camps: Roles and Challenges
As appreciation of the impact of Jewish camping has grown, so have efforts to increase the number of campers able to participate in these settings. Inclusion of campers with disabilities, though not a new phenomenon, has likewise expanded. As more services are provided to campers with disabilities, more camps are hiring an Inclusion Coordinator to spearhead and manage these initiatives. This article explores the work done by these professionals and the challenges they face in doing so. The work of Inclusion Coordinators is discussed in the context of the evolving nature of camp-based inclusion efforts as a whole. The authors see inclusion at summer camps as an area in which much creative work has been done, and would benefit not only from additional resources but also from increased coordination as “a field.”
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 15, 2017
2   |   From section Teacher Education
Inclusive Attitudes: Considering Student Discussion Board Responses as Indicators of Attitudes
Compelling reasons exist for moving toward inclusion of diverse learners in Jewish day schools. Graduate programs face the challenge of preparing pre- and in-service teachers as effective educators for inclusive settings. While the development of skills is vital, the inculcation of positive attitudes regarding diverse learners may be equally important. This article explores the process of using student work to evaluate students’ attitudes in the context of a course on teaching diverse learners in a Master’s degree program.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 19, 2017
3   |   From section Informal Education
It’s Off to Work We Go: Attitude Toward Disability at Vocational Training Programs at Jewish Summer Camps
Baglieri and Shapiro (2012) argue that considering attitudes toward disability is an important step toward building a more inclusive society. This study examines attitudes toward disability of staff members of vocational and independent living skills programs for young adults with disabilities in four Jewish summer camps. McDermott and Varenne’s (1995) three approaches for understanding disability were used to examine staff attitudes. Concrete instantiations of all three approaches were found during site visits and interviews at the camps. Implications for the continued development of inclusive educational opportunities in the Jewish community are discussed.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 19, 2017
4   |   From section Formal Education
The Parent Perspective: Disabilities and Jewish Day Schools
The following study describes the experiences of parents with a child with a disability in Jewish day schools. The findings suggest marked differences in the experiences of parents whose child was able to remain in the day school and those who left as a result of their child’s disability. In the latter group, the themes of loneliness and marginalization were common. Although parents hoped to feel included in the Jewish community—with Jewish day school an important expression of this desire and commitment—many found few appropriate programs and services and a general lack of awareness of and sensitivity to disability issues in the Jewish community.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 15, 2017
5   |   From section Formal Education
Teaching the Whole Child by Evaluating Students’ Voices
To teach the “whole child” necessitates that we understand that child, including being attentive to who she is and wants to be throughout her time in school. It follows that hearing the student voice should play a significant role in studying texts. After conducting a one-year qualitative, collaborative action research study in one Modern Orthodox Humash class, my data show that giving students opportunities to dialogue authentically with parshanim (classical commentaries) and the teacher is essential to teaching the whole child, especially in a religious studies class.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: March 8, 2017
6   |   From section Formal Education
Whole Child Growth Through Jewish Integrated Learning
At the Jewish Enrichment Center, children involve their whole selves in Jewish learning: they dive into a Jewish text with peers, and wrestle, refine, and recreate their own personalized meaning through creative, in-depth projects which unfold over several months. The teaching modality we use is called integrated learning, in which children grapple with a complex question or idea for an extended period. As they work, children explore text and their relationship with text, wrestle with peers’ varied responses and our tradition, while practicing essential life skills, such as cooperation, engagement with diverse perspectives, and resilience. The projects are not supplemental to the learning, but the projects are the path through which children learn. This article will describe our third through fifth children’s exploration of the driving question, “What is berakhah?,” with insight into how the project process builds children’s Jewish knowledge as well as social-emotional skills.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: March 19, 2017
7   |   From section Formal Education
Learning to Read Hebrew in a Jewish Community School: Learners' Experiences and Perception
Author S. Walters
This paper presents findings from a qualitative study conducted in a large Reform Jewish Sunday school in the UK. It focuses on learners’ experiences and perceptions of learning to read Hebrew in the school as well as in the other sites in which they were learning to read. These experiences and perceptions are neglected in other research accounts. The findings reveal important insights into learners’ experiences, enjoyments, frustrations and expectations regarding both the purposes and the processes of learning to read in Hebrew and raise issues about learning and teaching. The findings contribute to wider debates about literacy and learning to read and address questions raised in the literature concerning what children do with, and make of, the language learning they experience in their community school setting.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 22, 2017
8   |   From section Formal Education
What Are the Goals of Kindergarten? Teachers’ Beliefs and Their Perceptions of the Beliefs of Parents and of Agents of the Education System
The study examined the beliefs of kindergarten teachers (K-teachers) regarding the goals of kindergarten. We asked K-teachers to reflect on their own beliefs, their understanding of parents’ beliefs, and their understanding of the beliefs that guide agents of the education system. We further examined differences between K-teachers based on the type of kindergarten in which they worked (religious or secular) and the socioeconomic status of children’s families (middle-high or middle-low). A total of 120 K-teachers responded to closed questionnaires, and 12 teachers also participated in a semistructured interview.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: February 22, 2017
9   |   From section In-Service Training
Inclusion Assistants in General Education Settings - A Model for In-service Training
Author Anat Moshe
The inclusion assistant (IA) is a fairly new position in the education system and is the outcome of current ideological and legislative steps to include students with special needs into the general educational system. The IA's function is to personally accompany students with severe disabilities - autism, developmental disabilities, physical disabilities, and mental disorders - in the general class. This paper reviews the roles and characteristics of this challenging position and offers a model of an easy-to-implement, in-service, professional development program with minimal time demands that can serve to increase the IA's skills.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 22, 2017
10   |   From section Informal Education
Ramah Releases Alumni Survey
The Ramah Camping Movement has released the results of “The Alumni of Ramah Camps: A Portrait of Jewish Engagement.” This survey of more than 5,000 camper alumni was conducted by Professor Steven M. Cohen of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion and the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at Stanford University.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: February 22, 2017
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