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Search Results for '. Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education - Jewish Theological Seminary' (Author / Editor)
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1   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Gleanings: The Future for Jewish Day Schools
Gleanings is the ejournal of the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of the Jewish Theological Seminary. Our Jewish day schools are at a crossroads. For this issue of Gleanings, we asked the top thinkers, leaders, and doers in the Jewish day school sector today to respond to three basic questions: 1. What does Jewish day school education look like today and what could it look like in the future? 2. Why is this important for our collective Jewish future? 3. What should day school leaders do to help us achieve the results we want?
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: November 27, 2017
2   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Gleanings: The Promise of Jewish Early Childhood Education
Jewish early childhood education is not only an entry point into Jewish learning for young children. Often, it also becomes a reentry point for parents: many adults disenchanted by Jewish life in their own youth (or simply lacking exposure to it) take a renewed interest in pursuing Jewish life as a family as their children are invited in through their school programs. This potential opportunity for the Jewish community is why we at the Leadership Commons are so invested in Jewish early childhood education. In this Gleanings, we explore how Jewish early childhood can ignite the fire of Jewish learning for children and their families.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: July 17, 2017
3   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Gleanings: A Dialogue on Jewish Education
What do we hope to achieve from Jewish education? If we no longer view the ultimate goal of Jewish education as reducing intermarriage, then what are our desired outcomes? How does the dialogue about goals and outcomes play out in our multiple Jewish educational settings and in the relationship with the philanthropists who support Jewish education? In this issue of Gleanings, the ejournal of the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary, we seek answers to these important questions.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 24, 2017
4   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Gleanings: The Future of Leadership
Gleanings is the ejournal of the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of the Jewish Theological Seminary. What should we believe about leadership? How can we effectively educate for leadership? How might we build collaborative leadership for our communities? “Leading Places to Work: Are Jewish Organizations Great Places to Work?” compiled by the organization Leading Edge, shows evidence that our community has significant challenges in recruiting and retaining professional talent. Previous to this report, the Bridgespan Group, noting that over the next five years, 75 percent of the CEOs and EDs of our institutions will be retiring, raised questions about professional pipelines and succession plans to ensure strong, effective leadership for the future. To stimulate conversation, we’ve invited respected community thinkers to address these issues.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: November 16, 2016
5   |   From section Formal Education
Gleanings: Unleashing the Power of Congregational Education
Gleanings is the ejournal of the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary. Ever since the 1992 National Jewish Population Study, many of us—educators, clergy, philanthropists—have been engaged in heroic efforts to revitalize congregational education. While we have had made notable progress for which we should be rightly proud, this field has remained stubbornly resistant to deep transformation. This past October, The Davidson School of JTS brought together a group of scholars, rabbis, educators, and change practitioners from across denominations and North America to learn together and begin to design an innovative path forward. Out of this gathering came a renewed sense of hope, a desire for collaboration among diverse institutions, and a revitalized sense of transformative purpose. In this issue of Gleanings, we present a selection of the papers that participants wrote for our deliberation which stimulated rich dialogue. Included first in this issue is a nascent, overarching vision of education toward covenantal community, which emerged during the gathering.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: May 16, 2016
6   |   From section Formal Education
Gleanings: Teaching Jewish Texts
Gleanings is the ejournal of the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary. The art and science of text study is an area in which many scholars and practitioners affiliated with The Davidson School devote their time, attention, and passion. We are particularly excited to have launched an initiative creating the first ever compendium of standards and benchmarks for the teaching of rabbinic literature through our Jewish Day School Standards & Benchmarks Project. We are honored to steward this project in partnership with leadership teams from over 15 day schools, scholars, and leaders across academic institutions and agencies throughout North America and across all denominational lines. To sit with them is to truly feel the roots in the legacy of the Jewish beit midrash! We hope you enjoy the wide array of perspectives on the topic of Jewish text study contained in this edition of Gleanings.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in JTEC: January 6, 2016
7   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Gleanings: The Meaning of Meaning in Jewish Education
Gleanings is the ejournal of the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary. In this issue of Gleanings we look at the concept of "meaning" - how people use it, what it might denote, and what the implications of these ideas are for our work in Jewish education. The articles in this issue of Gleanings are part of a larger collection that The Davidson School sourced from over 20 leaders in Jewish education as part of a conference convened in June 2015 at JTS around the term "meaning" with support from the Lippman Kanfer Foundation for Living Torah.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in JTEC: October 18, 2015
8   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Gleanings: Godtalk
Gleanings is the eJournal of the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary. This first issue of volume 2 of Gleanings focuses on Godtalk in classrooms, camps and other Jewish educational settings. Please join us in the conversation about this important issue.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in JTEC: July 14, 2015
9   |   From section Trends in Jewish Education
Gleanings: Inclusion and Special Needs
Gleanings is the ejournal of the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary. This sixth issue of Gleanings focuses on inclusion and special needs. Please join us in the conversation about this important issue.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in JTEC: July 14, 2015
10   |   From section In-Service Training
Romemanu Mi’Kol Lashon – Raising the Discourse of Hillel Educators
Over 50 Hillel professionals met the first week of June at Capital Camps for the first Hillel Educators Kallah. Attendees represented the gamut of Hillel roles, directors, engagement professionals, campus rabbis, and more. Regardless of title or job description, we consider ourselves Jewish educators. But we were stuck when asked if we really consider ourselves educators – what was our pedagogy? What was our method and practice? How could it be assessed, and indeed, are we even able to really demonstrate our successes? It became clear during our discussion that if Hillel staff, regardless of academic training, are going to consider ourselves Jewish educators, we need a method and practice that will merge the central elements, or commonplaces, of Judaism (God, Torah and Israel) with the central elements of education (subject, learner, educator and environment). What would be a curriculum that could be shared by Hillel movement? Even further, how would we measure the successful implementation of that content?
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in JTEC: July 1, 2015
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