MOFET JTEC - Informal Education

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Last update in this section: April 26, 2017
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The latest papers and research studies published in the world's leading academic journals in the field of teacher education.
Informal Education
The Long-Term Effects of Youth Mentoring on Student Mentors' Civic Engagement Attitudes and Behavior
The current study was designed to explore the delayed effect of participating in youth mentoring programs, training in civic engagement, and activism on a sample of 337 Israelis 5 to 10 years after serving as student mentors. Qualitative and quantitative findings showed that these former mentors' perception of the contribution of mentoring was correlated with their current civic engagement attitudes and activism.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 26, 2017
Let's Get Campers Jumping and Running to Learn Hebrew!
Hebrew Through Movement has been energizing Hebrew learning across North American for the last 5 years. With its start in Cleveland, OH over a dozen years ago, HTM brings laughter and smiles to the learning of Hebrew. And, because of its kinesthetic nature, Hebrew is sticking deep in the kishkes of its learners. While also part of learning in early childhood and day school settings, HTM has gained huge traction in part-time Jewish educational programs. Based on the number of educational programs who enrolled teachers in the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland’s online seminar (over 900), it would be easy to suggest that 9,000 – 15,000 youngsters have been jumping, running and pointing their way to Hebrew learning.
Publication Year: March 22, 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: April 26, 2017
Auschwitz As Seen Through the ‘Lens of Faith’
After Orthodox educators traveled to Poland to provide insight into experiences of observant Jews at Auschwitz- Birkenau, tour guides at the museum have recently incorporated the “lens of faith” when showing visitors around the concentration camp. While Auschwitz has for years worked with Yad Vashem and the US Holocaust Memorial Museum to uncover the depth of the Nazi atrocities perpetrated against the Jews, the recent initiative of Brooklyn’s Amud Aish Memorial Museum and Kleinman Holocaust Education Center is the first of its kind by the Orthodox community.
Publication Year: April 5, 2017     |    Updated in JTEC: April 19, 2017
Inclusion Coordinators at Jewish Summer Camps: Roles and Challenges
As appreciation of the impact of Jewish camping has grown, so have efforts to increase the number of campers able to participate in these settings. Inclusion of campers with disabilities, though not a new phenomenon, has likewise expanded. As more services are provided to campers with disabilities, more camps are hiring an Inclusion Coordinator to spearhead and manage these initiatives. This article explores the work done by these professionals and the challenges they face in doing so. The work of Inclusion Coordinators is discussed in the context of the evolving nature of camp-based inclusion efforts as a whole. The authors see inclusion at summer camps as an area in which much creative work has been done, and would benefit not only from additional resources but also from increased coordination as “a field.”
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 15, 2017
It’s Off to Work We Go: Attitude Toward Disability at Vocational Training Programs at Jewish Summer Camps
Baglieri and Shapiro (2012) argue that considering attitudes toward disability is an important step toward building a more inclusive society. This study examines attitudes toward disability of staff members of vocational and independent living skills programs for young adults with disabilities in four Jewish summer camps. McDermott and Varenne’s (1995) three approaches for understanding disability were used to examine staff attitudes. Concrete instantiations of all three approaches were found during site visits and interviews at the camps. Implications for the continued development of inclusive educational opportunities in the Jewish community are discussed.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in JTEC: March 19, 2017
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